Original Research

Corporate citizenship in South African business education

R. Hamann, L. Van Duin, C. Appels, E. Taylor, E. Akor
South African Journal of Business Management | Vol 37, No 2 | a601 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajbm.v37i2.601 | © 2018 R. Hamann, L. Van Duin, C. Appels, E. Taylor, E. Akor | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 10 October 2018 | Published: 30 June 2006

About the author(s)

R. Hamann, Centre for Corporate Citizenship, College of Economic and Management Sciences, University of South Africa, South Africa
L. Van Duin, Centre for Corporate Citizenship, College of Economic and Management Sciences, University of South Africa, South Africa
C. Appels, Centre for Corporate Citizenship, College of Economic and Management Sciences, University of South Africa, South Africa
E. Taylor, Centre for Corporate Citizenship, College of Economic and Management Sciences, University of South Africa, South Africa
E. Akor, Centre for Corporate Citizenship, College of Economic and Management Sciences, University of South Africa, South Africa

Full Text:

PDF (85KB)

Share this article

Bookmark and Share

Abstract

This paper seeks to enhance our understanding of the extent and manner in which corporate citizenship and related topics are taught to business students in South Africa. It argues that there are increasingly prominent drivers for integrating these topics in business education, but we know little about how South African business schools are responding. The methodology relies on a survey of business schools’ websites, as well as two survey questionnaires, one of which was aimed at MBA coordinators, while the other targeted a range of “MBA stakeholders” consisting of recent MBA graduates and representatives from business, government, and civil society. The findings suggest that, though there are some proactive business schools, South African MBA programmes are generally still dominated by conventional notions of business success. Furthermore, there are important contradictions between the perceptions of MBA coordinators, on the one hand, and those of the MBA stakeholders, with the latter generally demanding more rigorous treatment of corporate citizenship issues. The overarching conclusion is that a more committed engagement of and by South African business schools is required on the need for integrating corporate citizenship in business education.

Keywords

No related keywords in the metadata.

Metrics

Total abstract views: 100
Total article views: 49

 

Crossref Citations

1. Bank employees’ engagement in corporate social responsibility initiatives at a South African retail bank
Vincent C. Penn, Peta H. Thomas
Acta Commercii  vol: 17  issue: 1  year: 2017  
doi: 10.4102/ac.v17i1.379